List of Countries That Listen To the Podcast: Ireland

10 days ago, we started a  New Feature: Let’s See What Countries Listen to the Ed Boston Podcast.

The first country listed in the link above was Sri Lanka.

Today’s country is IRELAND, which is sitting at the #5 position on the list of countries who listen (the list constantly changes).

From Wikipedia:

The Republic of Ireland, the 1922 state, comprising 26 of the 32 counties of Ireland, was “styled and known as the Irish Free State”.  The Constitution of Ireland, adopted in 1937, provides that “the name of the State is Éire, or, in the English language, Ireland”. Section 2 of the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 states, “It is hereby declared that the description of the State shall be the Republic of Ireland.” The 1948 Act does not name the state as “Republic of Ireland”, because to have done so would have put it in conflict with the Constitution.

The government of the United Kingdom used the name “Eire” (without the diacritic) and, from 1949, “Republic of Ireland”, for the state;  it was not until the 1998 Good Friday Agreement that it used the name “Ireland”. 

As well as “Ireland”, “Éire” or “the Republic of Ireland”, the state is also referred to as “the Republic”, “Southern Ireland” or “the South”.  In an Irish republican context it is often referred to as “the Free State” or “the 26 Counties”.


Religion in the Republic of Ireland 
Religion Percent
Roman Catholic

Religious freedom is constitutionally provided for in Ireland. Christianity is the predominant religion, and while Ireland remains a predominantly Catholic country, the percentage of the population who identified as Catholic on the census has fallen sharply from 84.2 percent in the 2011 census to 78.3 percent in the most recent 2016 census. Other results from the 2016 census are : 4.2% Protestant, 1.3% as Muslim, and 9.8% as having no religion.  According to a Georgetown University study, before 2000 the country had one of the highest rates of regular Mass attendance in the Western world.  While daily attendance was 13% in 2006, there was a reduction in weekly attendance from 81% in 1990 to 48% in 2006, although the decline was reported as stabilizing. In 2011, it was reported that weekly Mass attendance in Dublin was just 18%, with it being even lower among younger generations.

The Church of Ireland, at 2.7% of the population, is the second largest Christian denomination. Membership declined throughout the twentieth century, but experienced an increase early in the 21st century, as have other small Christian denominations. Significant Protestant denominations are the Presbyterian Church and Methodist Church. Immigration has contributed to a growth in Hindu and Muslim populations. In percentage terms, Orthodox Christianity and Islam were the fastest growing religions, with increases of 100% and 70% respectively.

Ireland’s patron saints are Saint Patrick, Saint Bridget and Saint Columba. Saint Patrick is the only one commonly recognized as the patron saint. Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated on 17 March in Ireland and abroad as the Irish national day, with parades and other celebrations.

As with other predominantly Catholic European states, Ireland underwent a period of legal secularization in the late twentieth century. In 1972, the article of the Constitution naming specific religious groups was deleted by the Fifth Amendment in a referendum. Article 44 remains in the Constitution: “The State acknowledges that the homage of public worship is due to Almighty God. It shall hold His Name in reverence, and shall respect and honour religion.” The article also establishes freedom of religion, prohibits endowment of any religion, prohibits the state from religious discrimination, and requires the state to treat religious and non-religious schools in a non-prejudicial manner.

Religious studies was introduced as an optional Junior Certificate subject in 2001. Although many schools are run by religious organisations, a secularist trend is occurring among younger generations.


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